March

15 March…

The famous Boat Race between the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, the two biggest universities in the UK takes place on an irregular basis since 10 June 1829. But today in 1927, is the first Women’s Boat Race.

Originally the two female crews were not allowed on the river at the same time and so were judge on their time and style. It wouldn’t be until 1935 when the races became similar to the mens contest, racing over a 1/2 mile on the Cam or the Isis in Oxford.

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March

8 March…

The first woman in the world to receive a pilot’s license happens today in 1910. French aviator Raymonde de Laroche was issued her license by the Aero Club de France.

She would gone on to participate in aviation meetings in Egypt, Saint Petersburg Budapest and Rouen. As well as win awards in 1913, such as the Aero-club of France’s Fernina Cup for a non-stop long-distance flight, and set two women’s records in1919. The two records where for altitude, where she receive 15,700 feet and the women record for distance of 201 miles.

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March

1 March…

Three women, a Caribbean slave, Tituba, a homeless beggar, Sarah Good and an elderly Sarah Osborn – were brought before the magistrates Jonathan Corwin and John Hathorne today to be questioned. Their crime? Witchcraft.

Today in 1692, the Salem Witch Trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts.

After a number of school girls experienced uncontrollable delusions, vomiting and muscle spasms, a local doctor diagnosed them with “bewitchment” and they pointed the finger at the three women.

Soon all three accused women were arrested. Whilst Good and Osborn proclaimed their innocence, Tituba admitted to being a witch. Despite their pleas, all three were found guilty of witchcraft and sentenced to hang in July 1692.

When Sarah Good stood before the gallows, she was asked again to confess by Rev. Nicholas Noyes and to save her soul. Far from confessing, Good shouted:

“I’m no more a witch than you are a wizard! If you take my life away, God will give you blood to drink!”

Funny enough 25 years later, Noyes died from a haemorrhage – choking on his own blood.

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Sources and to read some more:

*Salem – http://salem.lib.virginia.edu/people/good.html

*History – https://www.history.com/topics/colonial-america/salem-witch-trials

*Rovolvy – https://www.revolvy.com/page/Nicholas-Noyes

February

20 February…

Today in 1935, Caroline Mikkelsen is the first woman to set foot on the Antarctic island.

Caroline was a Danish-Norwegian explorer who jointed the 8 crew members of the whale oil tanker M/S Thorshavn to Antarctica. The Captain of the ship was Klarius Mikkelsen, who was also Carolines husband.

in light of the Norwegian discovery, a mountain in the area of the landing site is named after her – Mt.Caroline Mikkelsen.

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February

9 February…

“United Procession Of Women, on Saturday, Feb. 9th, to assemble in Hyde Park, Band Stand, Hyde Park Corner, at 2pm”.

It would be the largest women’s suffragette demonstration seen to date, with over 3,000 women joining the march in 1907.

Later to be known as the Mud March, due to the heavy rain leaving the marchers covered in mud, this march was the first large peaceful public demonstration in support of votes for women.

Coinciding with the opening of parliament, whilst the march didn’t achieve anything parliamentary wise, the impact on public awareness was large. Gathering support, especially through peaceful protests, over a year later on 21 June 1908 up to half a million people joined the Women’s Sunday march.

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Source & to read some more:

Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mud_March_(suffragists)

Bonus Fact · February

6 February…

Today in 1952, whilst at the Treetops Hotel in Kenya, Elizabeth II becomes Queen of England and Northern Ireland upon the death of her father King George VI.

Queen Elizabeth II is the longest reigning monarch in British history, having ruled the country for more than 60 years.

Fun fact: the Queen has written more than 45,000 Christmas cards during her reign.

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January

28 January…

Today in 1813, Jane Austen’s novel, Pride and Prejudice, is published and goes on sale.

The original title of the novel was “First Impressions” and was written in October 1796. Jane Austen was only 20 years old. However, late 1797, the novel was rejected and refused publication by London publishers.

From the publication and success of her second novel, Sense and Sensibility, Austen went back to First Impression’s and revised the novel in 1811. The three-volume novel was now re-titled to “Pride and Prejudice“ and was copyrighted by Thomas Egerton for £110.

Although Thomas Egerton would make more money on the sale of the novel than Jane Austen, she was still proud for her second (public) novel to be published.

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